The San Francisco State University has been rocked by an ‘armed violence’ threat, forcing buildings to close until Tuesday.

The person of interest behind the threat was already detained under the San Francisco State University Police Department while the investigation is ongoing.

As it is considered safe to reopen, normal operations will return to the campus on Wednesday, Sept. 29.

In a statement to KRON4, SFSU said that they were conscious of the armed violence threat that popped through social media, which has already been deleted. Students and staff, however, managed to share the post.

“University administrators, in an abundance of caution, made the decision to move in-person classes and work to remote modalities for the day while UPD investigates the credibility of the threat,” SFSU said.

At 10:00 in the morning, the police delayed the activities and in-person classes.

“Due to an ongoing investigation, in-person courses and work are suspended for Tuesday, September 28m” the SFSU said through an alert at around 8:00 in the morning.

The lockdown of the university building and the library will stay until Tuesday.

“The public safety presence on campus has been increased as part of the ongoing investigation,” SFSU said.

At around 3:00 in the morning, the initial alert was received in inboxes, telling non-essential workers not to enter the school while the students are expected to remain in their dormitories.

The university said remote classes went on unhampered on Tuesday.

The SFSU community was assured by University President Lynn Mahoney, who addressed students and staff that the authorities will carry on the intensified presence in the school for safety purposes.

“While a person of interest has been detained and we no longer believe that there is an ongoing threat to campus, I recognize that this has been traumatic, particularly for residential students and staff on campus.”

The Counseling and Psychological Services of the SFSU is open for students in need of counseling, while employees can reach out to the Employee Assistance Program, Mahoney said.