The United States fell far behind China and Europe in terms of domestic production of electric vehicles, the International Council on Clean Transportation’s study said, citing the increase in the gap in the years 2017 to 2020.

The study said that more than 10 million electric passenger vehicles have been manufactured worldwide between 2010 and 2020. US-based automakers made out 20 percent of the international stock by 2017’s end. They represented some 18 percent of the EVs total since 2010 by last year. Meanwhile, production shares in China and Europe recorded an increase.

The variation has been triggered by government policies that support EV, said ICCT.

“Electric vehicle manufacturing growth happens where there are strong national policies designed to spur the market forward,” ICCT’S program director Nic Lutsey exclaimed in a statement. “Hundreds of billions of dollars are on the table, and the United States hasn’t even bothered to pull up a chair.”

As discovered by the researchers, China, in the 10-year period between 2010 and 2020, led the international production of EV. About 44 percent of manufactured EVs were accounted for by China, which also posted about 4.6 million units in production and sales in the same period.

During the same decade, Europe has generated 25 percent of the electric vehicles. It has manufactured 2.6 million units and sold 3.2 million.

Automakers based in the US generated at least 450, 000 last year. Most of the produced EVs are accounted for by Tesla, with about 85 percent.

EV manufacturers like Tesla find it necessary to ship and establish shops beyond the US as they see more demand abroad. Companies are most likely to put their products for sale in the stores closer to their plants.

Last year, electrics only accounted for 2.3 percent of the new vehicle sales in the US. In Europe, it was at 10 percent while in China it was at six.