Working four days a week increases productivity and satisfaction among workers, SFGATE reported.

This became the basis of a San Francisco-based startup company Bolt is permanently implementing a four-day workweek.

The arrangement in working days was first implemented by the e-commerce company last fall, according to a report by CNBC.

Its 500 employees surely loved the program!

In an interview with CNBC, Bolt founder and CEO Ryan Breslow said that employees were overjoyed after the program initially started for three months.

The majority of the workers, or 94 percent, want the four-day workweek to stay. Breslow said over 80 percent of the employees cite a boost in their productivity given the new work arrangement.

Bolt also ripped the results of its program, having garnered high likability among its employees. It gained a 4.9 out of 5 rating at Glassdoor, a job site where an average company is rated at 3.3.

The CEO said that the concern of working five days a week is the dependence on “work theater,” or “people caring more about the appearance of working than the actual work.” 

“It’s impossible to sift through the noise and get to the heart of the matter,” Breslow said in his CNBC interview.

He noted “countless” conferences and presentations that are prone to block up one average day at work.

The “Great Resignation” is also important to this, according to CNBC.

The Great Resignation is seeing an increase in unhappy and exploited workers who lessen the usual 40 hours at work per week. Cutting down the working hours may be beneficial for employees who are still unwilling to return to the workforce.

A record-shattering 4.5 Americans left the workforce in November last year. The Great Resignation numbers also saw a 13.1 increase as many others quit their jobs between September and November.

SFGATE reached out to Bolt for comment but it did not immediately give its response.