San Francisco officials have not yet established plans for mass vaccination sites, making Matt Haney, the city’s supervisor, frustrated, as the region moves slower than other counties that have already opened vaccination sites.

San Francisco’s Mass Vaccination Sites

San Francisco Mayor London Breed and other city leaders are avoiding the responsibility by placing the responsibility of vaccine distribution over to the private providers, said Haney. By developing a website, he hopes to see the city and county taking over so that residents can sign up for vaccination shots.

Additionally, San Francisco has previously done well in its efforts to set up testing sites across the region, said Haney, noting he wanted similar motivation with the vaccines. The supervisor recommended using Kezar Stadium and Chase center as mass vaccination sites.

On Wednesday, Mayor Breed said that her top priority is for the people to get their first shot of the COVID-19 vaccine. However, she said that before they can start the rollout, they need to have more doses of the vaccine.

“We’ve only received a very limited number of doses, which are being administered. But we’re ready for more when we get them,” Breed posted on Twitter, KRON4 reported.

Currently, pharmacies and private distributors are teaming up with San Francisco officials to optimize the distribution of the vaccines. Through the SF Health Network, the city announced the eligibility to people who are 65 years old and above for vaccination. Only frontline and health care workers were allowed to receive doses of the vaccine previously.

In the statistics data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as of Wednesday, only 2.3% of California’s population has received the vaccine since the middle of last December. Each patient must have two shots of the vaccine to be effective, which are spaced approximately three to four weeks apart.