Bay Area Anticipates Another Rainfall Event Since November

This weekend, forecasters have announced that the Bay Area could expect rainy weather across the state. Despite the incoming downpour, the news does not reduce California’s worries about the fire situation and drought in the region. The expected weekend rainfall is the country’s first shower in December – nearly a month after the last one on November 18.

On Thursday morning, the National Weather Service meteorologist Drew Peterson stated that California has to start somewhere with the upcoming rain.

Since November 18, the Bay Area has not experienced another rainfall. The lack of downpour raised concerns among state residents and meteorologists, fearing the possibility of another dry winter coming up like what happened last year. Peterson stated that the predicted rain this weekend is measurable, but it would not bring heavy amounts. A cold front would blow across the North Bay on Sunday. By the end of Friday, it would hit the district’s lower region.

Peterson expects that the coast and mountains would experience the heaviest rains. Coastal areas could expect to receive rainfall as much as 11/4 inches. Meanwhile, three-quarters of an inch would pour over the domains of southern Napa, Marin County, and the Santa Cruz Mountains.

Rainwater amounts would fall significantly lighter in South and East Bay areas. Santa Clara Counties would receive 1/8 to 1/4 inches. Approximately 1/4 to 0.5 inches would pour down on Alameda and Contra Costa districts.

Peterson declared in the weather forecast that the Bay Area could expect light precipitation activity from Friday to Saturday. By Sunday, the state anticipates the arrival of the next cold front, bringing in heavier rains.

The National Weather Service also announced that this weekend, Sierra could experience a snowy climate from Friday to Saturday. The expected amount of snowfall would measure up from 8 to 12 inches above 6,500 feet.

Despite the winds in the Bay Area slowly subsiding, forecasters still cautioned that gusts running up to 45 mph would blow by the state by 4 pm on Thursday. Wind recommendations along the North Bay coast would remain until then.

California Experiences Severe Effects of La Niña Activity

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration revealed continuous moderate to robust La Niña activity over the Pacific region. The cycle brings warmer waters to the Pacific ocean, causing a season to pour down more rain than usual. Forecasters expect the conditions to last until March next year.

Peterson noted that the rainy season starts quite late due to years of La Niña experience. He also stated that the Bay Area would experience a dry start if rain begins from late December to early January.

The weather information shows that too much rainfall is destructive. Since October 1, San Francisco has experienced rains amounting to only 0.5 inches. For that period, the historical average only measures up to 9%.

Due to the overwhelming dry season, the National Weather Service issued red-flag warnings across the Bay Area every Sunday and Monday. The frequent notices note the high possibility of December experiencing a rare fire incident.

As of late, the Bay Area did not report any severe fires happening across the region. However, Southern California’s dry state has recorded at least three massive fire incidents, and they continue to burn until this day.

The abnormally dry climate continues to expand and spread. According to the US Drought Monitor’s weekly report on Thursday, the drought has covered approximately 95% of the country’s overall land. The recorded dry state percentage is California’s highest total yet since March 2016.

Moreover, about 21% of the states, including far north of Northern California and Sacramento Valley, currently experience “extreme drought” conditions. This news confirms that California presently faces more worsening bouts of dry climate.